array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98574" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(12) "Section_Lead" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(10) "Lead Story" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98574" ["subject"]=> string(39) "Buyer Preferences This Spring? Standard" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By RISMedia Staff" ["data"]=> string(1773) "With inventory lower-than-low and prices rising, the market is anything but ordinary this spring. Buyers, nonetheless, are opting for traditional, according to realtor.com®. 
 
The average buyer is on the hunt for a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home, complete with a garage and a kitchen that is updated, realtor.com research reveals. (More than one-quarter, or 27 percent, are all about the garage; 24 percent desire a contemporary kitchen; and 20 percent are looking for an open floor plan.) 
 
There are differences by generation, the research shows. The majority of millennials prefer a Colonial or a contemporary home, while the majority of 55-plus buyers are pursuing a ranch.
 
Why are buyers in the market? Family needs (17 percent) and rent raises (23 percent) are among the drivers motivating millennials, while 55-plus buyers are being prompted by a desire for comfort, privacy and stability.
 
"Although record-low inventory and high prices make this housing market unique, some classic features still top most shoppers' wish lists," says Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com. "At the same time, we found some clear differences in priorities. For instance, older buyers are concerned with privacy and being able to age comfortably, while millennials place more emphasis on family needs, stability and personal expression."
 
For more information, please visit www.realtor.com" ["preview"]=> string(489) "With inventory lower-than-low and prices rising, the market is anything but ordinary this spring. Buyers, nonetheless, are opting for traditional, according to realtor.com®. The average buyer is on the hunt for a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home, complete with a garage and a kitchen that is updated, realtor.com" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(1) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(3) "835" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(4) "Ad_1" ["item_type"]=> string(2) "ad" ["zone"]=> string(4) "Ad 1" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98573" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_01" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 1" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98573" ["subject"]=> string(35) "Fair Housing: From Dream to Reality" ["authors"]=> string(52) "Commentary by the National Association of REALTORS®" ["data"]=> string(3661) "April 11, 2018 marks 50 years since the Fair Housing Act legislation passed, but for some Americans, the "American Dream" of homeownership remains just that—a dream. Although significant strides in fair housing have been made since the 1968 passage of the Fair Housing Act, there's still work to do in order to achieve its intended goals.
 
Even today, minorities are sometimes ushered toward specific neighborhoods. Other groups, such as LGBTQ and veterans, also feel the sting of steering. Ultimately, discriminatory housing practices contribute to racial and economic segregation in communities, which can lead to disparate outcomes in individuals' overall quality of life—including health, education, and economic opportunity.
 
We All Have a Role to Play
All Americans deserve the same access to the opportunity of housing. The National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) has evolved in our history, which reflects some of the same issues our country faced. While we acknowledge our role in the past, we recognize our place in the present and our responsibility to drive continued progress. It's time to bring greater awareness to these critical issues. Fair should mean fair for all Americans. It's an obligation we are proud of and remain vigilantly aware of—not just because fair access to housing is part of adhering to the REALTOR® Code of Ethics, but because it's the right thing to do.
 
Our members make a difference in every interaction they have with clients. Together, we can have a significant impact on policies that create broader change.
 
Accomplishing this begins with self-awareness. What biases do you have? What assumptions do you make that don't even feel like discrimination? Even the most well-intentioned real estate professionals can inadvertently assume something about a person's preferences based on someone's age, race, sexual orientation, family status, etc. Each of these assumptions, in the strictest sense, potentially violates the Act.  
 
A Yearlong Commemoration
In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, the NAR will join with our partners and allies to raise awareness and create action. These partners include: Throughout 2018, you'll be hearing more about events and initiatives intended to 1) improve our commitment to fair housing and property rights by acknowledging our history and recognizing past champions; 2) commemorate the passage of the Fair Housing Act and actions to realize the promise of the law; and 3) embrace our role in the forefront of advancing fair housing and leading efforts to address community issues.
 
Learn More
Housing is a critical element of civil rights and fair treatment of all Americans. To learn more about the history of fair housing, what's next for fair housing, and how NAR and its partner organizations are commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, please visit www.FairHousing.realtor. Together, we can spread the word that "Fair Housing Makes U.S. Stronger." " ["preview"]=> string(314) "
​April 11, 2018 marks 50 years since the Fair Housing Act legislation passed, but for some Americans, the "American Dream" of homeownership remains just that—a" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98572" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_03" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 2" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98572" ["subject"]=> string(74) "Financial Literacy Month: Educating Clients on Budgeting and Credit Scores" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By Liz Dominguez " ["data"]=> string(6327) "April may be Financial Literacy month, but in the real estate industry, agents rely on the state of their clients' financials year-round. The current spring market is proving to be an environment in which consumers with healthy financials thrive. It's never been more important to have good credit—interest rates are trending upward, as are home prices, and a nationwide inventory shortage is creating an ultra-competitive market.
 
Agents have a responsibility to their clients, whether renters, buyers or sellers, to educate them on staying financially healthy even after a real estate transaction has closed so they can move forward with buying or selling in the future. No easy task, as many U.S. residents do not prioritize saving. According to FinancialLiteracyMonth.com by Money Management International, Americans carry more than $2 trillion in consumer debt, and 30 percent of consumers are living paycheck to paycheck. 
 
This month, agents can help their clients achieve a financially secure future by focusing on the following:
 
Understanding Real Estate Financials
For most first-time buyers, the financials of real estate are a mystery. Agents should explain to clients that their budget should make room for not only a home's down payment if purchasing but also closing costs for both buyers and sellers. While a lender is responsible for discussing these line-by-line charges, agents should follow up to ensure the client understands and is not being put a financially difficult situation.
 
Down Payments 
Conventional loans typically ask for at least 20 percent down, but there are low-down payment options (for example, FHA loans only require a 3.5 percent down payment); however, agents must remind buyers that any loans with less than 20 percent down require private mortgage insurance (PMI), for which they must budget an additional 0.3 percent to 1.5 percent of the original loan amount per year. The cost varies depending on down payment size and the client's credit score.
 
Closing Costs
Many new buyers are not aware of closing costs and only budget for a down payment. These can vary depending on where the buyer or seller lives, but typically come to around 5-10 percent of the home's sale price for sellers and 2-5 percent for homebuyers, according to Zillow
 
Seller closing costs may include: Buyer closing costs may include: A Healthy Credit Score
Consumers should know that credit scores set the baseline for many segments of the real estate industry. Interest rates, for example, can be higher for those with low credit scores. In addition, homeowners insurance can also fluctuate depending on credit. Even after a transaction has closed, agents should continue guiding clients toward a higher credit score as it will help to ensure they become financially-viable return clients.  
 
Agents can point clients toward one of the three credit bureaus—Experian, TransUnion and Equifax—for tips, which include the following: Tools for Success
There are various apps that help consumers to budget and keep track of their financials. While agents can only provide services for which they are licensed, directing clients to a financial professional or resources is the easiest way to educate without introducing risk.
 
Agents may consider recommending the following tools to their clients: Liz Dominguez is RISMedia's associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com." ["preview"]=> string(256) "
April may be Financial Literacy month, but in the real estate industry, agents rely on the state of their clients' financials year" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98571" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_04" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 3" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98571" ["subject"]=> string(56) "Affordability Challenged in Over Half of Markets: Report" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By RISMedia Staff" ["data"]=> string(1745) "Affordability is being crunched in 68 percent of, or 304 out of 446, counties in the U.S., according to ATTOM Data Solutions Q1 2018 U.S. Home Affordability Report. Buyers, in other words, are not earning enough to make monthly payments on a property.
 
Analysts at ATTOM considered a 3 percent down payment and a 28 percent maximum front-end debt-to-income ratio, as well as data on wages from the Labor Department. The findings? In addition to 68 percent of markets tagged as unaffordable, there is a gap between the appreciation of home prices and growth in wages in 83 percent of markets (370 of 446), including in at least three California counties: Los Angeles County, Orange County and San Diego County.
 
Affordability is also worse year-over-year in 73 percent of markets (326 of 446), according to the report. Affordability has dwindled the most in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Diego counties in California, and in Miami-Dade County, Fla., and Queens County, N.Y.
 
Forty-one percent of markets (181 of 446), meanwhile, are not as affordable as they were historically, including, again, Los Angeles and San Diego counties, as well as Dallas and Harris counties in Texas and Kings County, N.Y.
 
There are areas, however, that are more in-reach. Fifty-nine percent of markets (265 of 446) are more affordable than they were historically, including Cook County, Ill., Maricopa County, Ariz., and King County, Wash.

Learn more from the report. 
 
Source: ATTOM Data Solutions" ["preview"]=> string(295) "
Affordability is being crunched in 68 percent of, or 304 out of 446, counties in the U.S., according to ATTOM Data Solutions Q1 2018 U.S. Home" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98475" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(11) "Section_04a" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 4" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98475" ["subject"]=> string(33) "FHFA: Home Prices Rise in January" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By RISMedia Staff" ["data"]=> string(763) "Home prices rose 0.8 percent month-over-month in January, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency's (FHFA) recently released House Price Index (HPI). The HPI year-over-year—based on prices for homes with Fannie Mae- or Freddie Mac-backed mortgages—was up 7.3 percent.
 
Per the Index, month-over-month home price changes ranged from -0.7 percent in the West South Central Census division to +1.2 percent in the New England and Pacific divisions. Home price changes year-over-year ranged from +5.1 percent in the West South Central Census division to +10 percent in the Mountain division.
 
Source: Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) " ["preview"]=> string(287) "
Home prices rose 0.8 percent month-over-month in January, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency's (FHFA) recently released House Price Index" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98570" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_05" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Home Spun Wisdom" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98570" ["subject"]=> string(53) "Upgrading: 4 Tips for Moving out of Your Starter Home" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By Kara Masterson" ["data"]=> string(3668) "Editor's Note: This was originally published on RISMedia's blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin' now at blog.rismedia.com: It was great to have your own place, but it's finally time to move out and look for something beyond your starter home. You've probably saved a little cash and are ready to finally be in a place you're proud to call home. The following four tips can help you move out stress-free:
 
Reduce Debt Before Your Move
Buying something beyond a starter home is likely going to be a bit pricier. This means you don't want to go into this with previous debts to worry about. You want to make sure that you get rid of credit card debt and avoid additional debt like car or student loans. Taking this step early will help you free up your money and may even help you make a better down payment.
 
Shared Living May Work
Those who want a better home but know that it might be financially rocky may want to consider living with another person, perhaps a brother or sister. There are a lot of young homeowners starting to cohabitate to reduce the financial stress linked to homes that are little more expensive. You save money this way, and you help a loved one move out at the same time.
 
Seek Professional Help
There's a lot that you have to juggle when searching for a home, but there is no reason to worry when you have a real estate agent there for you. Things like finding a home in a neighborhood you want or making sure that the house you find has an updated electrical system that can support your needs, are things your real estate agent can hunt for. All you have to do is show up, and make sure the house you find speaks to you.
 
Get a Second Gig
It may be time for you to get a second job, and there are a number of ways you can do this through the shared economy. Use your phone to look for tasks that you can complete on the side, such as driving people around through ride-sharing apps or helping deliver groceries through grocery-delivery apps. A second gig works around your schedule but can help bring in additional cash, which you might need to stabilize your finances after making such a big purchase.
 
It may require a little sacrifice and may be nerve-wracking but moving out of your starter home is something you'll feel proud about. Some of these steps should make this easier but be sure you take your time as you make this move. Talk to your real estate agent to see if they have additional suggestions for you.
 
Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from Utah. She enjoys tennis and spending time with her family.
 
This article is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as professional advice. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of RISMedia." ["preview"]=> string(490) "It was great to have your own place, but it's finally time to move out and look for something beyond your starter home. You've probably saved a little cash and are ready to finally be in a place you're proud to call home. The following four tips can help you move out stress-free: Reduce Debt Before" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98492" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_06" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(17) "More News Stories" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98492" ["subject"]=> string(41) "Maximizing Your Most Important Technology" ["authors"]=> string(12) "By Rick Geha" ["data"]=> string(4359) "What's the one thing all sales professionals have in common, and yet, each of theirs is completely different?
 
Whether or not you've heard this question before, the answer is the same: your database.
 
Simply put, the Census Bureau says that if you graduated from high school, you know 2,000 people by first name. Then why do most sales professionals only have 200-500 people in their database? When you really think about it, it's actually disturbing how many people you know—or have met—that are not on your list. We don't, as a whole, truly leverage our database.
 
Not only are there many books written about the power of communicating with your database, there are also entire coaching companies and coaching systems built around the subject. In fact, almost every single seminar I've attended has focused in part on building, managing, servicing and growing one's database. Without a doubt, communicating with your database is a simple, inexpensive and results-oriented way to bring in more business.
 
Then why is it so hard for real estate professionals to take advantage of the simplest and least expensive tool we have for getting business? That's a loaded question that I answer often in my classes and talks on mindset and behavior. The fact is, leveraging your database can easily have the biggest ROI and make the most remarkable difference in your income.
 
If we go with the belief that change is painful for most—and that communicating regularly constitutes change for the majority of us—we can begin to understand why we don't do it. I'm always stunned at the number of people who would rather spend money they don't actually have to buy leads when they can communicate, mostly for free, with their database and get tons of leads.
 
Now, I'm not saying to stop all of the other things you're doing. What I'm saying is that if you're not working and leveraging your database, you're leaving money on the table.
 
In addition to using your database to grow your business, you want to make sure you grow your database at the same time. My goal, for instance, is to grow my database by at least 60 people per month. My database includes past clients, people I know or have known for a while, real estate professionals from all over the U.S. and Canada whom I have met or know, and so many more. Your database is a living, breathing organism, so spend some time finding people to add to it by scouring old yearbooks, address books, databases, wedding invitation lists and holiday card lists. 
 
I would be remiss if I didn't mention what we recommend to our coaching clients when it comes to this subject. We have a couple tools that allow us to track and monitor what's being done in this area, as well as tools that drive activities. In addition to our DSH (Daily Success Habits form) that allows you to track your time and activities, we also have an eBook by our founder Verl Workman that shows exactly how to get to 86 transactions a year while working the Top 50 people from your database for just an hour a day. And last, but not least, our ABCs of Lead Management tool is instrumental in scheduling specific times during the month to call your database and leads.
 
Rick Geha began his real estate career at age 22 and has been selling for over 36 years; he has run, managed or owned real estate offices for the past 23 years. His love of people and mentoring their passions has led him to a successful career as a speaker, trainer and coach. Over the past 15 years, he's led more than 1,000 classes and workshops throughout the U.S. and Canada and has presented keynote addresses to thousands of professionals from all industries and walks of life. Rick is proud to be someone who's spent nearly three decades helping people worldwide discover and walk their path to personal freedom and is currently a coach with Workman Success Systems. Contact him at Rick@RickGeha.com. For more information, please visit www.workmansuccesssystems.com" ["preview"]=> string(476) "What's the one thing all sales professionals have in common, and yet, each of theirs is completely different? Whether or not you've heard this question before, the answer is the same: your database. Simply put, the Census Bureau says that if you graduated from high school, you know 2,000 people by first name." ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98509" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_06" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(17) "More News Stories" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98509" ["subject"]=> string(41) "6 Things You Must Do Before Buying a Home" ["authors"]=> string(14) "By Dana Dratch" ["data"]=> string(5126) "(TNS)—Buying a home is a huge investment—probably the most significant purchase of your life. It's not something you should do without preparation.
 
Before you start on the road to homeownership, make sure you are ready.
 
Improve your credit score.
A high credit score snags you the best deals. "Below 660 or 680, you're either going to have to pay sizable fees or a higher down payment," says Barry Zigas, director of Housing Policy for the Consumer Federation of America.
 
A score of 700 to 720 can get you a good deal, and 750 and above can garner the best rates on the market.
 
Pull your credit reports and make sure you're not penalized for old, paid or settled debts.

Stop applying for new credit a year before you apply for a mortgage. Keep the moratorium in place until after you close on your home.
 
Figure out what you can afford.
There are various ways to determine how much house you can afford. If you're using an FHA loan, your monthly payment can't exceed 31 percent of your monthly income. The FHA will let you go higher under some circumstances.
 
For conventional loans, home expenses should not exceed 28 percent of your gross monthly income, says Susan Tiffany, retired director of Personal Finance Publications for adults for the Credit Union National Association, or CUNA.
 
Use Bankrate's calculator to figure out how much house you can afford. Add to that other housing expenses, such as taxes, insurance and utilities. Then, bank the difference between that total and what you're paying now.
 
Save for a down payment and closing costs.
You'll need to save between 3 percent and 20 percent of the house price for a down payment. Your credit history and loan terms help determine how much you'll need to come up with.
 
For example, with an FHA loan, the down payment requirement can be as low as 3.5 percent. You'll need a credit score of at least 580. Home loans backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, or VA, require no down payment.
 
Another cash expense will be closing costs. The national average for closing costs for a $200,000 mortgage is $2,084, according to Bankrate's latest survey.
 
If a big down payment is a hardship, look for down payment assistance. Search online using the city name, the county name and key word combinations such as "down payment assistance," "first-time homebuyers" or "homebuyer's assistance."
 
Down payment assistance often is based on location or reserved for particular buyers, such as first-time buyers. In a buyer's market, you can negotiate to have the seller pay a portion of the closing costs.
 
Build a healthy savings account.
Building up your savings—not just for a home—is very important. Your lender wants to know that you're not living paycheck to paycheck. If you have three to five months' worth of mortgage payments set aside, you're a much better loan candidate. Some lenders and backers, like the FHA, will give you more latitude on other criteria if they see that you have a cash cushion.
 
That money will also help pay for maintenance and repairs of the home. Most repairs are sporadic, but big-ticket fixes such as a new roof or water heater can come up suddenly and drain your budget.
 
A good rule of thumb is to assume that you'll spend 2.5 to 3 percent of your home's value each year on upkeep and repairs. If you buy a $250,000 home, aim to save $520 to $625 per month.
 
Get preapproved for a mortgage.
Before you start house shopping, you should get your financing in place.
 
"The No. 1 thing is (homebuyers) better have everything in order," says Dick Gaylord, a REALTOR® in Long Beach, Calif., and a former president of the National Association of REALTORS®.
 
Gaylord says you should get a mortgage preapproval "before you walk through the first house." Otherwise, "How do you know how much you can afford?"
 
Buy a house you like.
Short-term homeownership can be expensive, depending on how much you put down and what it cost you to sell your old house and move.
 
To get a home that will make you happy, don't count on a quick purchase. Step back and make certain the house you're considering is one that will fit the needs of you and your family.
 
©2018 Bankrate.com 
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC " ["preview"]=> string(455) "Buying a home is a huge investment—probably the most significant purchase of your life. It's not something you should do without preparation. Before you start on the road to homeownership, make sure you are ready. Improve your credit score A high credit score snags" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "84727" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26452" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_11" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(6) "Footer" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "84727" ["subject"]=> string(0) "" ["authors"]=> string(0) "" ["data"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(356) "RISMedia, publisher of Real Estate magazine, is the U.S. residential real estate industry's leading source for news, information, licensed content and events. To contact RISMedia please e-mail realestatemagazinefeedback@rismedia.com.

Copyright ® 2017. All Rights Reserved." ["link"]=> string(0) "" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } RISMedia's Daily e-News - Tuesday, April 03, 2018
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topStories Tuesday, April 03, 2018
Buyer Preferences This Spring? Standard
With inventory lower-than-low and prices rising, the market is anything but ordinary this spring. Buyers, nonetheless, are opting for traditional, according to realtor.com®. The average buyer is on the hunt for a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home, complete with a garage and a kitchen that is updated, realtor.com...
Read More >
   
articles
Fair Housing: From Dream to Reality

​April 11, 2018 marks 50 years since the Fair Housing Act legislation passed, but for some Americans, the "American Dream" of homeownership remains just that—a...
READ MORE >
Financial Literacy Month: Educating Clients on Budgeting and Credit Scores

April may be Financial Literacy month, but in the real estate industry, agents rely on the state of their clients' financials year...
READ MORE >
Affordability Challenged in Over Half of Markets: Report

Affordability is being crunched in 68 percent of, or 304 out of 446, counties in the U.S., according to ATTOM Data Solutions Q1 2018 U.S. Home...
READ MORE >
FHFA: Home Prices Rise in January

Home prices rose 0.8 percent month-over-month in January, according to the Federal Housing Finance Agency's (FHFA) recently released House Price Index...
READ MORE >
Homespun
Upgrading: 4 Tips for Moving out of Your Starter Home
It was great to have your own place, but it's finally time to move out and look for something beyond your starter home. You've probably saved a little cash and are ready to finally be in a place you're proud to call home. The following four tips can help you move out stress-free: Reduce Debt Before...
READ MORE >
articles
Maximizing Your Most Important Technology

6 Things You Must Do Before Buying a Home

 
 
  RISMedia, publisher of Real Estate magazine, is the U.S. residential real estate industry's leading source for news, information, licensed content and events. To contact RISMedia please e-mail realestatemagazinefeedback@rismedia.com.

Copyright ® 2017. All Rights Reserved.
 
   

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