array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98278" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(12) "Section_Lead" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(10) "Lead Story" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98278" ["subject"]=> string(52) "4 Creative Ways Real Estate Agents Market Themselves" ["authors"]=> string(16) "By Jameson Doris" ["data"]=> string(5741) "Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com: Every real estate market is different, and the agents that thrive are the ones that stand out and make an impact in their community. Sometimes thriving entails employing some creative marketing tactics. Successfully promoting yourself and your business is one of the greatest strengths you can have as an agent.

Most agents promote themselves on their sites and on social and with local ads, but standing out in your particular market can be more challenging. Here are some creative ways real estate agents are making themselves more visible and having a positive effect on their communities:

Give Guided Walking Tours
Certainly a strategy that would work most effectively in larger cities, partnering with tour companies or providing guided tours through your own business is a unique and underemployed strategy in real estate to organically generate leads. In New York, Jeff Goodman, a real estate agent, has collaborated with famed tour guide Joyce Gold to create a private series of walking tours entitled “Rediscovering New York.”

“Most of my business is referral-based and most of my business now comes from people in my network who have come on the tours,” says Goodman.

He serves as the producer of the walking tours and says Gold is the reason people show up. Goodman also admits that as a longtime active member of New York’s LGBT community, his association with Gold also overlaps with local organizations, which only generates more leads.

Reach Out to Local TV and Radio Stations
In smaller towns and more rural areas, contacting your local TV or radio station can be an excellent way to market yourself. Radio hosts and news anchors are always looking to report on the local real estate market, and by being featured on a local program, you can position yourself as a real estate expert in your community.

Preferably contact a station that you frequently listen to. Simply find the program’s contact information online—most have their own websites—and shoot them a quick email or call! Really putting yourself out there on the air like that isn’t easy, but if you’re confident and speak on aspects of the real estate industry that you know you’re knowledgeable in, you’ll not only generate leads, but you’ll also bring us to our next topic...

Become an Expert in a Niche
There’s more than just one way to position yourself as a real estate expert in your community. By focusing on your niche, there’s no quicker way to becoming a go-to source. Whether it’s real estate investing, renting townhouses, selling waterfront properties or any other topic you can immerse yourself in, just be sure you’re constantly consuming content pertaining to that niche.

If you’re sharing your thoughts and relevant articles regularly to your website and social accounts, and getting your opinions out there on TV and the radio, leads will start streaming in. This is by no means a quick process, but if you stick with it and become an expert in your niche, your advice will be sought and business will soon follow.

Attend Your Clients’ Housewarming Parties
No matter where you live in this country, after all the paperwork is done and your client has moved into their new home, they’ll likely want to show it off to friends and family. Housewarming parties are a perfect way to position yourself as the person that can help your clients’ loved ones find their next home. In all likelihood, the homebuyer will give attendees a tour of the home and pile the compliments on you.

It’s also possible that over the course of the home-buying process, you and your client didn’t become especially close. If this is the case, and you aren’t invited to a housewarming party, you can still reach out to your client and offer to sponsor their party. This will still give you an opportunity to have your name and branding present while guests are in the home. Be sure to provide business cards and a poster or two, as well as some sort of welcome gift with your branding on it.

There are many classic ways to market yourself in your community, such as associating with local charities and attending community events. These are often effective at generating leads, but sometimes it pays to think outside the box and take a more creative approach to getting your name out there. We’ve listed four of the more unique ways agents across the country are marketing themselves—what are some inventive ways you’re promoting yourself?

Jameson Doris is RISMedia’s blog and social media editor. Email him your blog ideas at jdoris@rismedia.com." ["preview"]=> string(478) "Every real estate market is different, and the agents that thrive are the ones that stand out and make an impact in their community. Sometimes thriving entails employing some creative marketing tactics. Successfully promoting yourself and your business is one of the greatest strengths you can have as an" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(1) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(3) "835" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(4) "Ad_1" ["item_type"]=> string(2) "ad" ["zone"]=> string(4) "Ad 1" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98277" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_01" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 1" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98277" ["subject"]=> string(47) "Professional Websites Now Free to REALTORS®" ["authors"]=> string(0) "" ["data"]=> string(848) "NAR PULSE— Placester® and NAR have come together through the REALTOR Benefits® Program to offer beautiful, mobile-ready real estate websites FREE to all REALTORS®. Learn more. 
 
An Everyday Way of Thinking
Read others’ stories, share your own, and join NAR’s commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act at www.FairHousing.realtorJoin the commemoration today. " ["preview"]=> string(315) "
Placester® and NAR have come together through the REALTOR Benefits® Program to offer beautiful, mobile-ready real estate websites FREE to all REALTORS®. " ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98276" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_03" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 2" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98276" ["subject"]=> string(56) "Regional Spotlight: All-Time High Prices, Sales in Texas" ["authors"]=> string(0) "" ["data"]=> string(2603) "Despite Hurricane Harvey’s impact, home prices and sales in Texas reached all-time highs for the third year in a row, according to the 2017 Texas Real Estate Year in Review report, recently released by the Texas Association of Realtors®.
 
“Despite the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, the Texas housing market had a very strong fourth quarter, helping solidify 2017 as another record-breaking year in Texas real estate,” says Kaki Lybbert, chairman of the Texas Association of Realtors®. “The strong growth in the housing market can be attributed to the sizable influx of residents and job growth across the state in 2017. With more than half a million people moving to the Lone Star State each year, we anticipate the Texas housing market will remain a hotbed for activity.”
 
Texas home sales jumped 4 percent in 2017, with 336,502 homes sold statewide. Home prices also experienced steady increases in 2017, with the median sales price increasing 6.7 percent from the year prior to $223,990.
 
“Across the state, we are projecting sales activity to be even more robust in 2018,” says Jim Gaines, chief economist at the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University. “One of the big drivers will be from first-time homebuyers finding opportunity in the market, with more builders focusing on the entry-level price point and lenders relaxing the requirements for first-time homebuyers. Additionally, the likelihood of more volatile interest rates in 2018 will influence homebuyers to buy now rather than later.”
 
Housing inventory across the state dipped 0.1 months to 3.1 months of inventory in December 2017. According to the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, a market balanced between supply and demand has between 6.0 and 6.5 months of inventory.
 
Texas homes continued to spend approximately the same length of time on the market in 2017, an average of 57 days, and active listings increased 5.5 percent from 2016 to 2017.
 
“The Texas housing market remains in such high demand that we continue to see low levels of housing inventory and strong increases in home prices,” Lybbert says. “While that continues to be good news for property owners, Texas REALTORS® will also continue to advocate for affordable options for all Texans.”
 
Source: Texas Association of REALTORS®
" ["preview"]=> string(291) "
Despite Hurricane Harvey’s impact, home prices and sales in Texas reached all-time highs for the third year in a row, according to the 2017 Texas Real Estate" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98275" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_04" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 3" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98275" ["subject"]=> string(67) "Cryptocurrency: First U.S. Real Estate Deed Recorded Using Ethereum" ["authors"]=> string(16) "By Liz Dominguez" ["data"]=> string(2920) "Cryptocurrency is making headlines again—this time, in real estate. A pilot program in South Burlington, Vt.—initiated by global blockchain real estate marketplace Propy Inc.—marks the first U.S. deed recorded using only blockchain technology, according to multiple sources. In this case, Ethereum was used to transact and record contracts and documents instead of using the city’s recording system.
 
“The announcement of a pilot project to utilize blockchain technology in real estate transactions is emblematic of Vermont’s long history of innovating business, insurance and financial technology,” said Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development Secretary Michael Schirling in a statement. “We are fortunate to have a cutting-edge statutory framework that enables the use of blockchain technology, and we will continue to work with the legislature to ensure Vermont remains at the forefront of these innovations.”
 
The pilot program was announced in January in partnership with the City Clerk’s Office of South Burlington. City representatives say Vermont’s legislation lends flexibility to blockchain use in real estate transactions.
 
“The Propy pilot will showcase the savings of blockchain distributed technology, furthering Vermont’s and the City of South Burlington’s goal to achieve more cost-effective government,” said Natalia Karayaneva, CEO of Propy, in a statement. “In parallel to making land record management systems significantly more efficient, Propy’s additional safeguards ensure additional data integrity.”
 
In Sweden, the mapping and land registration authority is moving forward with blockchain technology, using cryptocurrencies to conduct property sales. It expects to complete the first transaction in the next few months, according to the Wall Street Journal. The practice becoming more commonplace overseas may signal to widespread use in U.S. real estate transactions in the near future; however, with volatility and security still at the forefront as major challenges, blockchain needs to make strides to bridge the gap and assuage consumers’ fraud-based fears. Related startups are now emerging. The latest, according to Forbes—Messari—is based out of New York and vows to increase financial disclosures for cryptocurrencies. It is still in the early stages of seed funding before its product launch, but may be the solution to creating a public database for cryptocurrency data, helping investors to determine whether a blockchain-based transaction is safe or vulnerable.
 
Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at ldominguez@rismedia.com.
" ["preview"]=> string(270) "
Cryptocurrency is making headlines again—this time, in real estate. A pilot program in South Burlington, Vt.—initiated by" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98274" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(11) "Section_04a" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Featured Story 4" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98274" ["subject"]=> string(50) " ICYMI: HUD Considers Changes to Mission Statement" ["authors"]=> string(18) "By Suzanne De Vita" ["data"]=> string(4110) "The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is considering modifying its mission statement, eliminating “free from discrimination,” reported several sources. The agency’s mission statement, in part: 
 
HUD’s mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all. HUD is working to strengthen the housing market to…build inclusive and sustainable communities free from discrimination…
 
According to a memo obtained by Huffington Post, the altered mission statement is: 
 
HUD’s mission is to ensure Americans have access to fair, affordable housing and opportunities to achieve self-sufficiency, thereby strengthening our communities and nation.
 
The change eliminates “free from discrimination” and inserts “opportunities to achieve self-sufficiency.”
 
The agency issued a statement last Wednesday confirming it is considering the revision, noting “any mission statement for this department will embody the principle of fairness as a central element of everything that we do. HUD has been, is now, and will always be committed to ensuring inclusive housing, free from discrimination for all Americans.” 

The National Fair Housing Alliance condemned the news in a tweet:
 
Millions in the US continue to experience housing discrimination each year. @HUDgov is removing #AntiDiscrimination language from its mission statement. We won’t stand for it. #StillSegregated #FairHousing https://t.co/jb5BoECtu9
 
On Thursday, the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) reiterated its commitment to fair housing:
 
"As REALTORS® join with our industry partners, allies and consumers throughout 2018 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, we believe that fair housing for all should remain a core part of HUD's mission," said NAR President Elizabeth Mendenhall in a statement. "The Fair Housing Act provides that HUD will enforce the Act and administer its programs and activities in a manner that affirmatively furthers fair housing. When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law, he exclaimed that fair housing for all—all human beings who live in this country—is now a part of the American way of life. 
 
"Not only is fair housing integral to the ethical commitment of our members, as outlined in the REALTOR® Code of Ethics; it is critical to our ability to serve our customers, clients and the community," Mendenhall said. "We look forward to continuing our work with HUD to advocate for inclusive sustainable communities free from discrimination."
 
Stay tuned to RISMedia for more developments.
 
Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia's online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com.

 " ["preview"]=> string(294) "
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is considering modifying its mission statement, eliminating “free from discrimination,”" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98273" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_05" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(16) "Home Spun Wisdom" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98273" ["subject"]=> string(35) "How to Negotiate Your Rent Increase" ["authors"]=> string(17) "By Caitlin McCabe" ["data"]=> string(5239) "
(TNS)—Spring and summer are traditionally the busiest times in real estate, for both homes and apartments. Home shopping is more pleasant in the balmier months, moving is typically easier, and longer, sunnier days tend to give people more time to search for new digs.
 
Yet whether someone is hunting for a new home or staying put, tough decisions could await many this spring. For apartment tenants who found a home during the busy months of last year, lease renewals are likely approaching—and that could mean rent hikes.
 
A landlord's asking price is never final, especially in today's market. Here are some tips for negotiating.
 
Know your rights.
In many states, before a landlord can increase rent, a tenant's lease must be expiring; rent cannot be changed during an active lease. In addition, your state or city may require landlords to provide advanced, written notice of any rental price change.
 
Often, individual leases dictate how far in advance landlords must notify tenants—typically requiring 30 or 60 days. Even if a lease does not specify, state law often does. Pennsylvania and New Jersey, for example, require landlords to give a 30-day warning of a price change before a residential, market-rate lease ends. If a landlord does not, "they cannot increase the rent," says George Gould, a senior attorney at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia.
 
Philadelphia is even more specific: Unless a lease stipulates a longer period, the Philadelphia Code requires landlords to notify tenants 60 days before they increase rent for year-to-year leases, and 30 days before for shorter leases.
 
When it comes to actually raising the rent, however, Pennsylvania offers fewer restrictions. Pennsylvania has no statewide laws governing rent increases for market-rate units, meaning, in theory, landlords can hike rent as much as they want. New Jersey, similarly, has no statewide law, though nearly 100 municipalities have enacted rent-control ordinances that set increase limits.
 
New Jersey does, however, stipulate that rent increases may not be "unconscionable." Though no formal definition of "unconscionable" exists, Legal Services of New Jersey interprets it as any increase that is "extremely harsh" or "unreasonable." In some cases, the nonprofit says, that could mean a 20 percent hike, or even a 5 percent increase if the building's conditions are very bad.
 
Understand the market.
Many cities have experienced an unprecedented housing boom in recent years, meaning there's more supply than ever for renters to choose from.
 
Much of that inventory, including in the suburbs, has been high-end apartments—the kind that demand prices greater than $3 per square foot. And while such inventory has forced prices to jump, many buildings are providing "concessions"—a month of free rent, for example—to lure tenants. Accordingly, the actual price of renting is often cheaper than advertised.
 
In many places, rent growth has dipped as vacancy rates have gone up.
 
As a result, you should study the market, including average prices in the neighborhood or in comparable buildings. And, simply, ask (nicely) to negotiate. Landlords may negotiate with reasonable, informed residents.
 
Remind your landlord of your record.
"In the business of renting apartments, it's very costly to turn over tenants," says Allan Domb, a Philadelphia councilman and real estate broker. Turning over a one-bedroom unit, including repainting, carpet shampooing and cleaning, can cost $500 to $600, Domb says, and searching for a new tenant takes time—and money.
 
Landlords who find tenants through real estate brokers often must pay the agent a commission of one month's rent. "Landlords really do not want to pay that one-month commission every year," says Alan Nochumson, a Philadelphia real estate attorney.
 
A tenant who pays on time, maintains the apartment and complains infrequently should remind their landlord of that. Landlords would rather keep well-behaved tenants than pay turnover costs to find an unknown tenant.
 
Make a deal.
Often, offering to a sign a longer lease can bring the monthly price down—or mom-and-pop landlords may reduce the price if a tenant offers to pay multiple months upfront, thereby reducing the risk of missed payments.
 
If that does not work, ask if a landlord will budge elsewhere, such as on waiving a parking fee or prioritizing maintenance. Your landlord may be willing to fix that hole in your wall if you agree to his or her rent terms.
 
©2018 The Philadelphia Inquirer
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC 
" ["preview"]=> string(448) "Spring and summer are traditionally the busiest times in real estate, for both homes and apartments. Home shopping is more pleasant in the balmier months, moving is typically easier, and longer, sunnier days tend to give people more time to search for new digs. Yet whether someon" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98185" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_06" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(17) "More News Stories" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98185" ["subject"]=> string(41) "Buying for the First Time? Look Southeast" ["authors"]=> string(18) "By Suzanne De Vita" ["data"]=> string(2312) "Buyers fresh to the market are necessary—often, as a catalyst for other transactions. Currently, first-timers are in limbo, unable to afford or compete against the demand for scarce supply. At the entry level, there were 17.1 percent fewer options for sale at the beginning of this year than at the start of 2017, and first-timers generally have no proceeds from a prior sale to spend.
 
Buyers do have, however, opportunities for success. According to an analysis recently released by Zillow, first-timers should focus their search on the Southeast, where better conditions exist: affordable and available inventory, and appreciation that is expected to strengthen. 
 
"More and more millennials are reaching the point in their lives where they are ready to buy a home, but they are entering a highly competitive housing market that has been plagued by low inventory, especially among entry-level homes," says Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow. "Southeastern markets will be easiest for new buyers, where homes are more affordable and there's less competition."
 
According to the analysis, the best markets are:
 
1. Tampa, Fla.
2. Indianapolis, Ind.
3. Houston, Texas
4. Orlando, Fla.
5. San Antonio, Texas
6. Saint Louis, Mo.
7. Philadelphia, Pa.
8. Atlanta, Ga.
9. Las Vegas, Nev.
10. Dallas, Texas
 
Analysts based the list on markets with appreciation that is expected to be robust; a "Breakeven Horizon" that is relatively short (the Breakeven Horizon is the length of time before owning a home becomes better financially than renting one); favorable inventory-to-household ratios (an indicator of inventory); concentration of price reductions; and lower median values.
 
For more information, please visit www.zillow.com
 
Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia's online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com." ["preview"]=> string(487) "Buyers fresh to the market are necessary—often, as a catalyst for other transactions. Currently, first-timers are in limbo, unable to afford or compete against the demand for scarce supply. At the entry level, there were 17.1 percent fewer options for sale at the beginning of this year than ‚Äčat the start of 2017" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "98160" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_06" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(17) "More News Stories" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "98160" ["subject"]=> string(34) "Property Taxes: The Highs and Lows" ["authors"]=> string(18) "By Suzanne De Vita" ["data"]=> string(4252) "Editor's Note: This was originally published on RISMedia's blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin' now at blog.rismedia.com: Assorted expenses factor into homeownership. Beyond the monthly mortgage payment, homeowners are on the hook for maintenance, insurance and property taxes—and, in some cases, fees for the HOA or other services.
 
For many, the major obligation is property taxes. According to recently released research by WalletHub, the expense is highest in New Jersey, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York and Rhode Island, and lowest in Alabama, West Virginia, Arkansas, Louisiana and South Carolina. For a home with a median price tag, the taxes* total: 
 
Alabama – $550
Alaska – $3,048
Arizona – $1,367
Arkansas – $721
California – $3,237
Colorado – $1,516
Connecticut – $5,443
Delaware – $1,274
District of Columbia – $2,811
Florida – $1,702
Georgia – $1,413
Hawaii – $1,459
Idaho – $1,276
Illinois – $4,058
Indiana – $1,100
Iowa – $1,986
Kansas – $1,890
Kentucky – $1,078
Louisiana – $750
Maine – $2,329
Maryland – $3,191
Massachusetts – $4,132
Michigan – $2,185
Minnesota – $2,234
Mississippi – $841
Missouri – $1,408
Montana – $1,698
Nebraska – $2,506
Nevada – $1,478
New Hampshire – $5,241
New Jersey – $7,601
New Mexico – $1,232
New York – $4,738
North Carolina – $1,345
North Dakota – $1,729
Ohio – $2,064
Oklahoma – $1,076
Oregon – $2,637
Pennsylvania – $2,603
Rhode Island – $3,929
South Carolina – $821
South Dakota – $1,943
Tennessee – $1,088
Texas – $2,654
Utah – $1,508
Vermont – $3,893
Virginia – $1,973
Washington – $2,860
West Virginia – $629
Wisconsin – $3,257
Wyoming – $1,223
 
*Analysts assessed the effective real estate tax rate and median value.
 
Homeowners: Keep in mind that property taxes vary, and, occasionally, an assessment can be inaccurate.
 
"Sometimes errors are made in how local governments calculate the amount of tax a homeowner owes," explains James L. Murrett, president of the Appraisal Institute, an appraiser association. "It's possible for assessments to be based on flawed information, such as incorrect square footage or number of bedrooms or bathrooms or even location."
 
If an appeal is necessary, homeowners should consult their assessor's office and gather as much information as possible, Murrett recommends. An appraiser with experience in the local market can also be valuable, as well an attorney, REALTOR® and/or tax professional.
 
Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia's online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com." ["preview"]=> string(450) "Assorted expenses factor into homeownership. Beyond the monthly mortgage payment, homeowners are on the hook for maintenance, insurance and property taxes—and, in some cases, fees for the HOA or other services. For many, the major obligation is property taxes. According" ["link"]=> string(65) "http://rismedia.com/cs/{ID}/{AffiliateID}/{SubscriberID}/{ItemID}" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } array(2) { ["ItemsNewsletters"]=> array(5) { ["item_id"]=> string(5) "84727" ["newsletter_id"]=> string(5) "26342" ["section_id"]=> string(10) "Section_11" ["item_type"]=> string(4) "item" ["zone"]=> string(6) "Footer" } ["Item"]=> array(7) { ["id"]=> string(5) "84727" ["subject"]=> string(0) "" ["authors"]=> string(0) "" ["data"]=> string(0) "" ["preview"]=> string(356) "RISMedia, publisher of Real Estate magazine, is the U.S. residential real estate industry's leading source for news, information, licensed content and events. To contact RISMedia please e-mail realestatemagazinefeedback@rismedia.com.

Copyright ® 2017. All Rights Reserved." ["link"]=> string(0) "" ["type"]=> string(4) "item" } } RISMedia's Daily e-News - Wednesday, March 14, 2018
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topStories Wednesday, March 14, 2018
4 Creative Ways Real Estate Agents Market Themselves
Every real estate market is different, and the agents that thrive are the ones that stand out and make an impact in their community. Sometimes thriving entails employing some creative marketing tactics. Successfully promoting yourself and your business is one of the greatest strengths you can have as an...
Read More >
   
articles
Professional Websites Now Free to REALTORS®

Placester® and NAR have come together through the REALTOR Benefits® Program to offer beautiful, mobile-ready real estate websites FREE to all REALTORS®. ...
READ MORE >
Regional Spotlight: All-Time High Prices, Sales in Texas

Despite Hurricane Harvey’s impact, home prices and sales in Texas reached all-time highs for the third year in a row, according to the 2017 Texas Real Estate...
READ MORE >
Cryptocurrency: First U.S. Real Estate Deed Recorded Using Ethereum

Cryptocurrency is making headlines again—this time, in real estate. A pilot program in South Burlington, Vt.—initiated by...
READ MORE >
ICYMI: HUD Considers Changes to Mission Statement

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is considering modifying its mission statement, eliminating “free from discrimination,”...
READ MORE >
Homespun
How to Negotiate Your Rent Increase
Spring and summer are traditionally the busiest times in real estate, for both homes and apartments. Home shopping is more pleasant in the balmier months, moving is typically easier, and longer, sunnier days tend to give people more time to search for new digs. Yet whether someon...
READ MORE >
articles
Buying for the First Time? Look Southeast

Property Taxes: The Highs and Lows

 
 
  RISMedia, publisher of Real Estate magazine, is the U.S. residential real estate industry's leading source for news, information, licensed content and events. To contact RISMedia please e-mail realestatemagazinefeedback@rismedia.com.

Copyright ® 2017. All Rights Reserved.
 
   

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